Sustainable, well-planned, near to nature forest management deals with the production of raw timber. The classical central disciplines are silviculture, forest growth and yield and forest planning supplemented by information on the timber market, storage and bio-energy. Loss events, such as windfall, bark beetle or game damage, present an ever re-occurring challenge to forest personnel. Successful management in avoiding and limiting risks and damage is part of an effective operational strategy.

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The potential, opportunities and risks of using energy wood

The planned implementation of the energy transition is likely to place increasing pressure on natural resources. This raises the question of the potential, opportunities and risks associated with the use of wood for energy in Switzerland.

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02.07.2015 Ash dieback
Ash dieback

Ash dieback first occurred in Europe in 1992 in north-eastern Poland. In Baden-Wuerttemberg, the symptoms were first detected in plantations and natural regeneration in the spring of 2009. The FVA is studying ash dieback intensively.

Harvest-induced bark damage: a package of research projects

When trees are harvested, it is virtually impossible to avoid that a number of the remaining trees will suffer harvest related damage. However, there is evidence that in forest practice the amount of bark damage inflicted during a harvest operation often exceeds tolerable levels.

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Bioacoustic - a method to detect woodboring insects

The aim of this preliminary study was to provide a better understanding of the bioacoustics of woodboring insects in order to develop a practical method for early detection. Sound emissions from larvae of the red palm weevil, the asian longehorn beetle and longhorn beetle of the genus Monochamus were analyzed.

The invasive Asian longhorned beetle

An information sheet outlines the life cycle and significance of two non-native longhorned beetles, explains how to differentiate between them and native species, and sets out ways to combat infestation.

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Tree-oriented silviculture in young coppices

How to enhance the economic and ecological value of mixed coppices? Single tree oriented sylviculture on promising individuals of sporadic species with high-value timber since the young stage of mixed coppices. (10)
Wood Fuel on the Increase

Producing energy from renewable resources has become a trend. A trend in which timber also plays a role. However, how much wood energy can be used sustainably? A conference in Freiburg, Germany, provided information on strategies and answers to questions on the use of wood energy. (16)
ProCoGen: Adaption of Forests to Climate Change

European forests are unthinkable without Conifers. The threats posed by global warming, depletion by certain diseases and pests, fires, as well as harvesting rates exceeding regeneration, either naturally or artificially, are all important reasons for investigating our knowledge on the mechanisms underlining the expression of important adaptive and productive traits in our forest species.

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The Insect Pest Handbook: Prevention – Identification – Action

Besides bark beetles & Co, there are many other insects that can cause considerable damage to forests. What can be done when beetles, caterpillars or aphids are threatening the forest? (9)
The effect of mice, deer and blackberries on naturally regenerated English oaks

During the process of natural regeneration a large number of forest trees die in the germination or seedling phase. This is especially the case with oak trees which are the preferred browsing of hoofed game. The results of the following case study illustrate

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Heading image: Ulrich Wasem